All posts in “Hunter Wiggins”

CANCELLED – Public Forum: Loving the Stranger

UPDATE: This event has been cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Loving the Stranger: A Christian Reflection on Refugees and Immigration

6 to 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 15, in the Chapel
Open to the public, free admission
Childcare available for age 5 and under

Chicago attorney Hunter Wiggins will lay a Christ-centered foundation for issues involving refugees and asylum seekers. Then he will discuss changing interpretations of U.S. immigration law, what is happening to families and individuals at the border — and how Christians can respond.

Wiggins frequently travels to the Mexican border at Laredo, Texas, to give free legal representation to people seeking asylum in the U.S. He also has worked with refugees from Asia and Africa.

Loving the Stranger: Q&R with Hunter Wiggins

by Jim Killam | 6-minute read

 

Chicago attorney Hunter Wiggins

Chicago attorney Hunter Wiggins frequently travels to the Mexican border at Laredo, Texas, to give free legal representation to people seeking asylum in the U.S. At our March 15 forum, he will lay a Christ-centered foundation for understanding immigration issues. Then he will discuss changing interpretations of U.S. immigration law, what is happening to families and individuals at the border — and how Christians can respond.

Here’s part of our recent conversation with Hunter.

 

How did you get involved personally in this issue?

For a long part of my career, I have been involved in a whole range of pro bono issues. A couple of years ago the law firm I was working with at the time had opened an opportunity to go down to Laredo, Texas. They built a small immigration clinic to work firsthand, primarily with women and children who were seeking asylum coming across the border into Texas.

As a result of that, and of the things that God was doing to me in my heart, I became very captured by this. … I just kept going down there more and more, close to 15 times, and meeting with hundreds of women and men who have been held, frankly, in prisons that are not called prisons. Who are seeking asylum. Read More